FCC Proposes Hefty Fine After 2.3 Million Consumer Numbers Spoofed

FCC Becomes More Impatient, Demanding Industry-Wide Solution to Robocalls

The FCC joins consumers in their growing frustration in phone carriers not yet providing an industry wide solution to the robocall problem.

FCC Chairman, Ajit Pai has had about enough, and sent a letter to over a dozen U.S. mobile providers demanding that the “phone industry adopt a robust call authentication system to combat illegal caller ID spoofing and launch that system no later than next year.”

Pointing out the importance of the needed service to all consumers, Pai included that carriers have also fallen behind from when they were initially asked for a solution. Pai said they will take action to make sure a solution is provided if providers do not have programs up and running by next year.

However, “Chairman Pai also thanked those companies that have committed to implementing a robust call authentication framework in the near term,” stated a FCC Press Release.

Since, the FCC’s first request to find a solution to the scourge of robocalls that have flooded our nation, The FCC was able to do the following:

• On July 17, the FCC requested public input on the best way to provide a reliable system to verify caller ID information.
• In May 2018, Chairman Pai accepted the implementation of SHAKEN/STIR, recommended by the North American Numbering Council. Since then, they’ve formed the governance authority for implementing the program and determines the policies that carriers and its calls are considered trusted enough to “sign” calls originating on their networks. Their next step is to find a policy administrator that will certify carriers that are authorized to approve a call as legitimate and the certification authorities will be chosen to provide the “keys” that digitally flag a call as legitimate.

You might also like